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in Canada, one in five HIV-positive gay men doesn’t know he’s infected with HIV?

If you like swallowing cum make sure you take the right precautions…

Does lube or grease minimise the risk of lesions?    

+men = more tests! You like sex with a different partner every time, in that case, remember: the more men there are in your life…

Lube are either water-based, silicon or oil-based formulas. You need to use a lube that is compatible with the type of condom you’re using.  

Here, different types of sexual play are put in the context of full set of health risks they could involve…

Dildo, butt plug, vibrator… If you want to share your toys, remember to use a different condom on each one. As always, if you change holes, remember to change the condom you’re using.

You’ve probably heard or read that anti-HIV treatments are very effective. That they’ve increased the life expectancy for people living with HIV. That they’ve become less toxic, and that often you only need to take them once a day.

Your health matters to you more than anyone else, and taking care of yourself should be a priority. If you’re not sure about your health, or a partner’s health,

Sadomasochism, role playing games, S&M, bondage, whips, chains, clamps…

To take good care of your sexual health. Find a community organization closest to you.

In 3 clicks you will have a recommendation of how many annual HIV / STI tests to take.

So, you like to get high (party and play, PnP, chem session, slam… You like it because it sharpens your senses, and stretches out the excitement and desire.

Certain practices or preventive measures can reduce the risk of transmission…

Swallowing or not, fucking bareback or not. Whether you like to take risk, sometimes, often or not at all, you will find the necessary information to always be Ready for Action.

Post-Exposure Prophylaxis is a treatment that is taken soon after having unprotected anal sex

You might have already heard about PrEP. It’s an acronym for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis and is an anti-HIV treatment taken before engaging in sexual activity with a high potential of HIV infection.

It’s now possible to get vaccinated against hepatitis A and B, causes of liver disease, and against human papillomavirus (HPV), the viruses that cause genital or anal warts and which can lead to certain cancers.  

So you’ve been in a relationship for a while now. Negotiated safety involves setting the ground rules for sex outside the relationship if you and your regular partner decide to stop using condoms after being tested for HIV and other STBBIs.

Swallowing sperm or not, fucking bareback or not… No matter whether you often, never, or sometimes take risks, this site can help you make sure you’re always Ready for Action. Because being Ready for action means having the information you need to take care of your sexual health. Whether you’re gay, bisexual, trans, or just occasionally like to have sex with other men, you can have lots of fun in ways that are sexually fulfilling but also respect your limits. Regardless of how many partners you have, what you do with them, or the type of relationship you’re in, it’s always possible to be Ready for Action and feel at ease with the choices you make when having sex. One-on-one, or with more than one person – it’s up to you. Either way, taking precautions to reduce the risk of HIV or other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBIs, commonly referred to as STDs or STIs) doesn’t have to spoil the mood. By browsing through the different sections of this site, you’ll find lots of useful information about HIV testing and a number of other prevention methods. You can also learn more about what might be putting you at risk and about practices you can adopt to reduce these risks without giving up the things you enjoy. From a great blow job, to kinky play with a fuck buddy, to one-night stands – whatever turns you on, this site can give you the information you need to have the safest sex possible. Play it your way… And be READY FOR ACTION!   See also The origin of Ready for action | Limitations on liability   

Did you know that in Canada, one in five HIV-positive gay men doesn’t know he’s infected with HIV? This statistic includes men who occasionally have sex with other men. More specifically, a study carried out among gay men in Montréal (ARGUS survey, 2009) indicated that one respondent out of seven was living with HIV and wasn’t aware of it. Did you know that it is easier to get and STI such as syphilis than it is to get HIV? You’ll find, in this section, information that will help you to be Ready for Action   More men = more tests! |  3 months later |  More than “just HIV”  | More than “just pills” | Syphilis, not a +  | You + other people | You + your boyfriend | Your health is more important than prejudice | Your doctor or nurse: the more they know, the better  

Swallowing or not, fucking bareback or not. Whether you like to take risk, sometimes, often or not at all, you will find the necessary information to always be Ready for Action.           To swallow or not to swallow… it’s a question of taste | Viral load  | Risks involved in anal penetration | You haven’t been infected? It doesn’t mean you’re immune  | Taking pills prevent HIV

Regardless of your relationship status a condom and regular testing are the best ways to protect yourself from HIV, and keep your health intact. If you’re living with HIV, regardless of your relationship status, it’s important to get tested regularly for STBBIs. We recommend that you make getting tested one to four times a year part of your normal health routine. Whatever sort of relationships you may find yourself in, remember: not telling your boyfriend, fuck friend, or any partners you have outside of your relationship that you’re living with HIV could lead to criminal prosecution if you have high-risk sex, like anal sex without a condom. If you’d like, we can send you a reminder by text or email when it’s time to make an appointment at a testing centre. Use the “Testing reminder tool” situated in the right hand column.   You’re in a polyamorous relationship | You’re in a relationship | You’re single | You have a fuck friend, fuck buddy or friend with benefits | Your occasional partners on the side

You like to fool around with one, two or several partners. You’re aware that it’s not always possible to be 100% safe, that there’s always a level of risk, however minimal. This means you may sometimes choose to engage in practices you enjoy, in spite of the risks they involve. That’s part of what it means to be Ready for action. Here, different types of sexual play are put in the context of the full set of health risks they could involve, and strategies are given to help reduce risk. You’ll find all the tools and information you’ll need to evaluate risk and make informed decisions. At first you might ask yourself why you should bother with protection when nothing is really safe, but it’s well worth it to give the recommendations we’ve provided a try. They’re easy to incorporate in your sex life, and you’ll probably find they quickly become second nature. You may like to take drugs during sex (PNP, slam, chem session, etc.). Be aware that party drugs can affect your perception of risk. It can help to assess the risks you might be faced with ahead of time, and come up with ways to avoid or reduce them. That way you’ll be better prepared to stay on the right track when your judgment is affected. Even high on E, you can still be Ready for action. For more information on drugs and their effects, check out Drugs, alcohol and gay man, created by REZO   See also Oral sex | Anal sex | Barebacking and dipping | Finger fucking and Fisting | Sex toys | Manual sex | Frontal sex with penetration | Vaginal sex | Kink | Golden & Brown shower  | Public places | Bathhouses and saunas | Online Sources: HIV transmission: guidelines for assessing risk, HIV transmission risk: a summary of evidence, Fight against STBBIs  

You. Your health matters to you more than anyone else, and taking care of yourself should be a priority. If you’re not sure about your health, or a partner’s health, don’t hesitate to check out the REZO website (French only). They’re a Montréal-based organization promoting the sexual health and wellbeing of gay and bisexual men. If you think you need psychological help, don’t hesitate to contact a community-based HIV organization in your area. To find one, use the search tool located in the right hand column.  If you regularly do drugs during sex and think you might need help, don’t hesitate to contact a community-based HIV organization in your area. For more information on drugs and their effects, check out Drugs, alcohol and gay men, created by REZO. If you are a trans man and you’re taking hormones, don’t forget that sharing syringes increases your risk of HIV and STBBI. Some studies have shown that the level of HIV infection among the trans population is very high. If you like using sex toys, visit the sex toy section of this site to learn the best ways of preventing infections. You’ll also find lots of helpful information in this guide: Primed: the back pocket guide for transmen and the guys who dig them. If you need to, you also shouldn’t hesitate to contact ASTTEQ (Action Santé Travesti(e)s & Transexuel(le)s du Québec). Your health is just as important if you are living with HIV. Don’t forget that living with HIV makes it easier to contract another STBBI, and harder to treat it. What’s more, STBBIs can cause serious health problems and affect the effectiveness of your anti-HIV treatments. And of course there is also the delicate question of disclosing your HIV status to you partner or partners. For more information on that topic, check out the REZO brochure, Living positive as well as the section of the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network website on the criminalisation of non-disclosure of HIV.   See also: Condom | Lube | Latex glove | PEP and PrEP | Testing

On devra remettre la flèche et la phrase mauve dans les pages suivantes : -More men = more tests -You and other people -Youre in a relationship -Youre in a polyamourus relation -Youre single -Your fuckfriend -Your occasional partners on the side -Vaginal sex (texte spécial) -Online (après le 2e paragraphe)     If you want to know how often you should get tested, use the “my partners” tool situated in the right hand column.     Texte spécial pour sexe vaginal: If you have unprotected vaginal sex, whether it’s rarely or often, it’s recommended that you get tested regularly. To find out how often you should get tested every year, use the «My partners» tool located in the right hand column. Enter the number of partners you’ve had during the year.    

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